Monday, April 17, 2017

All through New York City straight to The Hague

When I'm not listening to you-know-what, I'm listening to other music, some of which is from the prior millennium.

For example, one of my favorite songs is an Eiffel 65 song. No, I'm not talking about Doobie Doobie Do or whatever it is, but the title song from that album, "Europop."



Within that song, Eiffel 65 endeavored to establish themselves as Italian dance music stars, in the same way that Falco had endeavored to establish himself as an Austrian music star in the prior decade. In an effort to link themselves to the dance music scene, "Europop" contains the lyric

All through Amsterdam straight to Italy

(Ironically, one of the most notable dance music figures is the Italian Giorgio Moroder, but I always think of him as a German because he was in Berlin when he was working with Donna Summer. But I digress.)

Recently I've been listening to another song - not from Eiffel 65's 1990s, nor from Falco's 1980s, but from the 1970s. I was younger then, and during that decade I purchased a compilation record from K-Tel ("Fantastic") and another one from Ronco ("Far Out"). One of those had the amazing song "Get Dancin'" from the greatest band of the 20th century (more or less), Disco Tex and his Sex-O-Lettes.

No, the leader of the band was not called Disco Tex. The leader was called Sir Monti Rock III. (Of course.)



If you've never heard the song before, be warned:

1975 was a strange time.

Strange indeed. While the Sex-O-Lettes sang some standard disco choruses, Disco Tex - I mean Sir Monti Rock III - would then interrupt with an early incarnation of rap. But the good Sir would not rap about chicken that tasted like wood, or about gritty urban life, or about mom throwing away your best porno mag. The good Sir would rap about - well, just about everything.

AllMusic:

Whether hairdresser, failed actor, or more or less or all combined, his screaming queen MC rants never fail to raise a smile -- the question is whether he realized the humor was unintentional or not. The title track provides some of his most memorable moments, screaming things during the instrumental breaks like "America needs you! We need you to go dance! We need you to get together, and boogie woogie woogie woogie! RADAR LOVE IS HERE!..."

Hold it. Stop right there.

Did he just say...Radar Love?



In the 1970s, "Radar Love" was the name of the international monster hit from Dutch band Golden Earring. Basically, nothing like the Disco Tex and his Sex-O-Lettes show. Golden Earring ROCKED.

Then again, Disco Tex did have the word "Rock" in his name.

(By the way, his birth name was Joseph Montanez, Jr..)

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Why I should have called my album "Gonna Win a Grammy"

I was just researching for another post when I ran across the story of what happened to Dr. Hook.

For those of you who don't know, back in the early 1970s the magazine Rolling Stone actually devoted itself to music. (Kinda like how MTV actually used to show music videos.) At that time, a musical act could get some serious sales traction from being featured in the magazine. (Today, of course, the magazine talks about everything.)

Rule Forty Two:

In 1972, cartoonist and songwriter Shel Silverstein visited Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show in the studio with a question: would they like to be on the cover of Rolling Stone? Since they were struggling for a hit, they said absolutely, although they couldn’t imagine how he would manage the trick. Silverstein then proceeded to play them “The Cover of Rolling Stone,” a complaint of jaded rock stars who haven’t yet achieved their dream of appearing on the front page of this publication...

So they recorded it.


The song became popular as kids like me listened to it. And guess what happened next?


By Rolling Stone; web source:http://www.rollingstone.com/photos/gallery/5392215/1973_rolling_stone_covers/photo/7/large, Link

Yes, that cover says "What's-Their-Names."

But wait - it gets better.

You'll recall that the original song includes a line that says, "Gonna buy five copies for my mother." Well, Rolling Stone was based in San Francisco at that time, so three members of the band went to Rolling Stone's offices to get those five copies. As Rule Forty Two notes, the band encountered a receptionist who apparently wasn't clued in to the music world.

“We were in full hippie regalia, with about thirty pounds of hair between the three of us,” Elswit said. “The receptionist didn’t know who we were or why we were there, and furthermore, didn’t much care. We were frostily informed that we could buy some from the dispenser machines downstairs."

At that point, someone with a clue showed up and gave the band members exactly five copies.

Dreams do come true.

P.S. If you haven't heard about MY album, go here.

Or listen to this. Not quite the rollicking fun of Dr. Hook, though.

Ontario Emperor Releases First Full-Length Album in Over 17 Years

Ontario Emperor releases digital album "Salad" on Bandcamp


Empoprises announces that musical artist Ontario Emperor has released his first full-length album in over 17 years. The ten-song album, "Salad," is available electronically on the "ontarioemperor" page at Bandcamp (ontarioemperor.bandcamp.com).

Ontario Emperor's music was originally released on mp3.com in 1999 and 2000, including the full-length album "Digital Judge" that was released in November 1999. After mp3.com ceased operations, Ontario Emperor released a free track on GeoCities. After GeoCities ceased operations, Ontario Emperor released a free collection of songs on last.fm. After last.fm ceased hosting music files, it was on to Bandcamp, where the song "Bare Plate" was released last month.

"It's been a while since I've released a full-length album," said the marketing flack who is pretending to speak for Ontario Emperor. "I'm happy that 'Salad' is finally available, and those who love melodic synthetica will enjoy the songs on this album."

The marketing flack also put words in the mouth of John E. Bredehoft of Empoprises. "Empoprises has been primarily known for textual content, but we are happy to be associated with musical content also."

The ten songs can be previewed on Bandcamp. Purchase of the album, or of selected individual songs, allows unlimited streaming as well as download of the song files.

Thursday, April 6, 2017

No, this isn't a new Pepsi ad, but it may have been a better one

I'm writing this after the fallout from the recent Pepsi ad in which Kendall Jenner saves civilization by sharing a Pepsi with a cop. By the time I got around to seeing the video itself, Pepsi had already pulled it.

After some thought, I decided that Pepsi should instead focus on the negative side of things - what crises would befall the world if people DIDN'T share Pepsi with others?

Well, as us older folk already know, that story was already told many years ago.


Saturday, April 1, 2017

"Underground Rocket" by Bruce Wyman is now available on CD Baby and Spotify

So anyway, a few months ago my wife and I visited some friends at their home. At one point during the evening, I wandered out to the garage and admired the husband's music setup (which is, to put it mildly, much more extensive than my own). That visit was one of the things that prodded me to finally restart my Ontario Emperor project.

I chose to release the Ontario Emperor music on Bandcamp.

My friend Bruce Wyman chose CD Baby.


As I write this, only the song "Underground Rocket" is available, but Wyman has plans to release a full album later this year.

And one advantage of being on CD Baby is that Wyman's music is (unlike my own) also available on Spotify.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

#oealbumreveal And the tentative title for the forthcoming Ontario Emperor album is...

..."Salad."


While the final track listing is yet to be worked out, one of the songs will be entitled "Plate." It may or may not bear a similarity to the already-released song "Bare Plate." (Less bare, presumably, although you can't really count on that.)

As of right now, "Salad" is NOT available. Stay tuned to https://ontarioemperor.bandcamp.com/ for further information.

P.S. While "Bare Plate" will not necessarily provide an indicator of what "Salad" will sound like, I can say that "Salad" sounds more like "Bare Plate" than, say, "Macarena." Here's a listen to the previously-released "Bare Plate."

Monday, March 27, 2017

The consequences of personal headspaces

For most of human history, music was a communal activity. All of the people in a particular room or small area would listen to the same music.

But over the last few decades, that has begun to change.


By Adamantios - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

As a result of this little invention, coupled with other items such as Walkmans and smartphones, a dozen people in a room may be listening to a dozen different things - and thus living in a dozen different headspaces.

This hit me over the weekend while I was out walking in my neighborhood, iPhone in my pocket, earphones in my ears. (This was not an iPhone 7, so such a configuration does not require workarounds.) From my perspective, I was walking down the sidewalk, and my ears were filled with the sound of Ladytron's "White Elephant." From the perspective of the gentleman in the front yard I was passing, he was standing in the grass, and his ears were filled with the sound of the water in his water hose.

But what if he had also been wearing earphones? (Watering the yard can be drudgery at times.) We would have an aural (rather than a visual) case of differing perspectives. My Helen Marnie would be his Robert Plant or whatever.

I've been thinking about headphones a lot lately, since the Ontario Emperor project is emerging as a "headphones" type of project. I don't think that I'll be performing "Bare Plate" in a live venue any evening soon - even if Renee Myara is singing along.

So what type of personal headspace am I creating for my listeners?

Monday, March 13, 2017

"Bare Plate" by Ontario Emperor now available on Bandcamp

If you've been reading the Empoprise-MU music blog recently, you've probably gotten an idea that something's up.

It started by my February 27 post about the temporary (or perhaps permanent) demise of last.fm's Music Manager, which once allowed me to host the entire "Brevity Is" music collection. The post concluded with the words

Of course, there are other music hosting services...

Then I wrote something a little over a week ago, along with a picture.


Then last Friday, I posted some instructions on how to replace the Microsoft GS Wavetable Synth in Windows 10.

Then yesterday (Sunday) I noted that Bandcamp songs scrobble to last.fm if you're using the last.fm Chrome extension, and I even embedded a song in the Sunday post - "Ringed by Lovers" by Helen Sventitsky, a long-time favorite song of mine that can be found on Bandcamp.

Well, tonight I'm going to embed another song that you can find on Bandcamp.



Yup. Tonight I can formally announce that for the first time in almost eight years, an Ontario Emperor song is now available on the tubes.

And, as you can probably figure out, it's on Bandcamp. This means that (at least for now) it's not available on Spotify, but (as noted above) I can still scrobble it to my heart's content.

And so can you.


"But wait a minute," you might be saying. The picture that you shared previously was in color, but the picture for 'Bare Plate' is in black and white. What gives?"

To be continued...

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Bandcamp plays scrobble to last.fm

Well, at least when using last.fm's Chrome extension (which also supports scrobbles from YouTube, but the tags are sometimes messed up).

Good to know.



P.S. Apparently you have to go to the Bandcamp site for the scrobbler to work; it won't scrobble from an embedded player. But you should play this song anyway because I like the chords.

Friday, March 10, 2017

Replacing the Microsoft GS Wavetable Synth in Windows 10

I guess it's fairly obvious that I'm working on something in regards to my old Ontario Emperor music project. But as I got deeper into the project, I decided that I needed to address something.

You see, the very first Ontario Emperor mp3 files - i.e. most of the ones that I uploaded to mp3.com - were all created on a Macintosh. But the final ones - "Non Sequitur 15" and the entire "Brevity Is" collection - were created after I got rid of my Mac, and therefore were composed and assembled on various Windows computers.

And they were...lacking.

Finally, after a decade and a half of putting up with this, I thought that maybe I ought to explore the issue and understand why MIDI files on Windows (I convert MIDI to audio) didn't sound all that great.

On Windows, the system used to generate MIDI sounds is called the Microsoft GS Wavetable Synth. It was a good solution (back in 1991).

Microsoft GS Wavetable Synth is the MIDI Synth that is bundled with Windows releases. It is licensed by Roland and based off of the first release version of Virtual Sound Canvas, at the time a commercial product. It contains its SC-55-based sound set which, while more compact and downsampled, was considered to be high quality at the time. Though its limitations have caused it to age poorly, it is still used as a standard for MIDI composers.

It turns out that it's really easy to upgrade to a better MIDI synth on Windows 10 - so easy that I could do it. To do so, you need a different MIDI synth, as well as a different (i.e. bigger) soundfont.

For the MIDI synth, I followed Anvil Studio's recommendation and installed the VirtualMIDISynth from CoolSoft - although there are others available.

For the soundfont, I chose Timbres of Heaven from Don Allen - primarily because it had step-by-step instructions on how to use Timbres of Heaven with VirtualMIDISynth. Again, there are a number of soundfonts out there.

After that, the only thing that I had to do was to go into Anvil Studio and set my MIDI Out Device to be CoolSoft (in the View menu, I chose the "Synthesizers, MIDI + Audio Devices" menu item).


So after that was set up, I played one of my MIDI files through Anvil Studio - and noticed a significant improvement.

Time to redo some audio files...

Sunday, March 5, 2017

The Ontario Emperor music project is set to announce...something

Back in 2009, I wrote a post about my Ontario Emperor six-song collection "Brevity Is" and how wonderful Anvil Studio was (although the free version limited songs to less than a minute) and how wonderful last.fm was as a host.

Then last month, I discovered that access to my last.fm uploaded files was disabled - for all I know, permanently. (Yes, I know that last.fm is supposedly working on something new and wonderful, but I've been down this road before.)

But what if I were to find another music file host, and if I were to start uploading stuff - perhaps an audio file, perhaps some artwork?


And what if (before uploading any audio files to that host) I were to finally get around to ordering Anvil Studio's Multi-Audio 1/8 accessory that would allow me to create audio files of more than a minute in length?

Yeah, that would be nice.

Monday, February 27, 2017

If Ontario Emperor rises again, it may not be on last.fm

Some of you know that before I blogged under my own name with the "Empoprises" brand, I blogged under the pseudonym Ontario Emperor. But Ontario Emperor dates long before I began blogging in October 2003. I won't take you back to the raw beginnings of Ontario Emperor, but back in 1999 (and until 2003), you could go to mp3.com and buy CDs with Ontario Emperor music. Track listings for a lot of the CDs are provided at my old Tripod site, but that site now has zillions of pop-up ads so I'll just reproduce the information here.

Besieged
October 2000
Rudy Left. Surround. Road Array. Nixon Landslide. Burning Coals. Days Summer Days. Firehose. Teasze Me. Non Sequitur 15.

Rudy Left
September 2000
Rudy Left. Windy Ridge. Bush League. Besieged by Reality. Transmission. Calculus Two. Veggie Stew.

Road Array
June 2000
Road Array. Facial. More Tea For Me. Tireless. Green Stream. Lost. Armsley Square. Flies.

Surround
March 2000
Latent Image. Surround. So Long I Sold You. Urban Plowman. Deeper in Debt (Jerry). You Want to Fly. Driving Two.

Digital Judge
November 1999
Finding My Anonymity. Or a Little Faster. Winter at Halfway House. Marooned with Mary Ann. Down the Pyro Lawn. Finding My Serenity. Gonna Walk. Deeper in Debt. November. Trashed Your Room. Finding My Tax Return. Run to the Snare. Football You Bet. I Demand a Japanese Car. Side of the Grove.

Or a Little Faster
July 1999
(deleted from CD catalog October 2000)
Or a Little Faster. Down the Pyro Lawn. Or a Little Rougher. Bucharest Sweat. Dial 911 at Boulder.

Firehose MaxiDisc
April 1999
(deleted from CD catalog October 2000)
Short Firehose. Taped Firehose. Ritalin Wail. Broken Beerlobe. Firehose. You Want to Fly. Fresh Firehose.

Firehose MiniDisc
April 1999
(deleted from CD catalog September 1999)
Short Firehose. Ritalin Wail. Broken Beerlobe. Fresh Firehose.

Cheating at Solitaire
February 1999
(deleted from CD catalog September 1999)
Burning Coals. Days Summer Days. Firehose. Teasze Me.


Of all of those, "Digital Judge" was my favorite, since I broke a rule that had existed for decades before my birth. This album had THREE sides (each of which began with a "Finding..." song).

All of the songs except "Non Sequitur 15" were instrumentals, and while I have CDs with the MP3s stashed away somewhere, I have long since lost the original lossless files (most of the songs were created on a Macintosh, and I haven't owned a Mac in over a decade).

After mp3.com went bye-bye, I preserved "Non Sequitur 15" on a geocities page...and then I uploaded a few files (including "Non Sequitur 15" and six new 2009 songs) to last.fm. The last.fm Music Manager worked out well for me, allowing me to upload both music and artwork for a collection that I called "Brevity Is."

Then geocities went bye-bye, and last.fm was the only site that hosted any of my mp3s.

I've been thinking about creating some new music again, and I began to check out various sites that could host my music. One option, of course, was to just upload the files to last.fm via the Music Manager.

But then when I went to my last.fm artist page to check my albums, I noticed something odd.


Yup, that's right - my "Brevity Is" album and its artwork are gone.

Things weren't much better when I got to the tracks page.


Yes, all the tracks are there (although they are no longer associated with albums)...but there's no way to play them from last.fm. I could play them if my songs were also on Spotify...but they're not.

So I went to the Music Manager page to sort this all out.


Of course, if I had checked Wikipedia earlier, I would have known all of this.

In January 2014, the website announced on-demand integration with Spotify and a new YouTube-powered radio player. Upon the introduction of the YouTube player, the standard radio service became a subscriber-only feature.

On 26 March 2014, Last.fm announced they would be discontinuing their streaming radio service on 28 April 2014. In a statement, the site said the decision was made in order to "focus on improving scrobbling and recommendations"....

In 2016, Music Manager was discontinued and music uploaded to the site by musicians and record labels became totally inaccessible; post-Spotify integration they could still be played and downloaded (where the option was given) but following this change not even the artists themselves are able to access their songs in the Last.fm catalogue.


From a business standpoint this makes sense, since last.fm in 2016-2017 is facing the same issues that mp3.com faced in 2003. The last.fm business model doesn't really allow support of someone with a couple of thousand plays.

Of course, there are other music hosting services...

Postscript: More on my song naming of mp3 and midi files (the midis are at that same ad-infested Tripod site).

Monday, February 6, 2017

Hard to #BoycottThe97 tech companies that united against the Presidential Executive Order

[OOPS - I POSTED THIS ON THE WRONG BLOG. BUT SINCE SPOTIFY'S ON THE LIST I'LL LEAVE IT RIGHT HERE.]

As USA Today reported early this morning, 97 companies filed a "MOTION FOR LEAVE TO FILE BRIEF OF TECHNOLOGY COMPANIES AND OTHER BUSINESSES AS AMICUS CURIAE IN SUPPORT OF APPELLEES." In essence, the companies objected to some of the immigration aspects of the executive order "PROTECTING THE NATION FROM FOREIGN TERRORIST ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES."

(DISCLOSURE: My employer has an interest in a separate portion of the executive order that is NOT cited in this particular court case, the "biometric exit" portion in section 7. I've briefly mentioned this section before.)

Those who support President Trump's position may choose to boycott these 97 companies, in the same way that companies such as Starbucks and 84 Lumber are being boycotted.

But 97 companies is a lot of companies.

If you're boycott-happy, here they are (Scribd link):

APPENDIX A
LIST OF AMICI CURIAE

1. AdRoll, Inc.
2. Aeris Communications, Inc.
3. Airbnb, Inc.
4. AltSchool, PBC
5. Ancestry.com, LLC
6. Appboy, Inc.
7. Apple Inc.
8. AppNexus Inc.
9. Asana, Inc.
10. Atlassian Corp Plc
11. Autodesk, Inc.
12. Automattic Inc.
13. Box, Inc.
14. Brightcove Inc.
15. Brit + Co
16. CareZone Inc.
17. Castlight Health
18. Checkr, Inc.
19. Chobani, LLC
20. Citrix Systems, Inc.
21. Cloudera, Inc.
22. Cloudflare, Inc.
23. Copia Institute
24. DocuSign, Inc.
25. DoorDash, Inc.
26. Dropbox, Inc.
27. Dynatrace LLC
28. eBay Inc.
29. Engine Advocacy
30. Etsy Inc.
31. Facebook, Inc.
32. Fastly, Inc.
33. Flipboard, Inc.
34. Foursquare Labs, Inc.
35. Fuze, Inc.
36. General Assembly
37. GitHub
38. Glassdoor, Inc.
39. Google Inc.
40. GoPro, Inc.
41. Harmonic Inc.
42. Hipmunk, Inc.
43. Indiegogo, Inc.
44. Intel Corporation
45. JAND, Inc. d/b/a Warby Parker
46. Kargo Global, Inc.
47. Kickstarter, PBC
48. KIND, LLC
49. Knotel
50. Levi Strauss & Co.
51. LinkedIn Corporation
52. Lithium Technologies, Inc.
53. Lyft, Inc.
54. Mapbox, Inc.
55. Maplebear Inc. d/b/a Instacart
56. Marin Software Incorporated
57. Medallia, Inc.
58. A Medium Corporation
59. Meetup, Inc.
60. Microsoft Corporation
61. Motivate International Inc.
62. Mozilla Corporation
63. Netflix, Inc.
64. NETGEAR, Inc.
65. NewsCred, Inc.
66. Patreon, Inc.
67. PayPal Holdings, Inc.
68. Pinterest, Inc.
69. Quora, Inc.
70. Reddit, Inc.
71. Rocket Fuel Inc.
72. SaaStr Inc.
73. Salesforce.com, Inc.
74. Scopely, Inc.
75. Shutterstock, Inc.
76. Snap Inc.
77. Spokeo, Inc.
78. Spotify USA Inc.
79. Square, Inc.
80. Squarespace, Inc.
81. Strava, Inc.
82. Stripe, Inc.
83. SurveyMonkey Inc.
84. TaskRabbit, Inc
85. Tech:NYC
86. Thumbtack, Inc.
87. Turn Inc.
88. Twilio Inc.
89. Twitter Inc.
90. Turn Inc.
91. Uber Technologies, Inc.
92. Via
93. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.
94. Workday
95. Y Combinator Management, LLC
96. Yelp Inc.
97. Zynga Inc.


How many of these companies have provided products or services that YOU used in the last few days? I can count Apple, Automattic, Facebook, Foursquare, GitHub, Glassdoor, Google, Levi Strauss, LinkedIn, Microsoft, Spotify, SurveyMonkey, Twitter, Wikimedia, and probably a dozen others that I missed.

So why Levi Strauss? Its Bay Area location? Its place in Silicon Valley corporate attire?

Actually, something different.

Inventions and discoveries by immigrants have profoundly changed our Nation. Some, like alternating current (Nikola Tesla), power our world. Others, like nuclear magnetic resonance (Isidore Rabi) and flame-retardant fiber (Giuliana Tesoro), save lives. And yet others, like basketball (James Naismith), blue jeans (Levi Strauss), and the hot dog (Charles Feltman), are integral to our national identity.

And the brief doesn't even mention Albert Einstein or Wernher von Braun.

Semi-ambient hip-hop - Living Legends, "Never Fallin"

A Facebook friend shared a video, along with the comment

There's a special place in my heart for hip hop songs built on eno samples

But not just any Eno sample.

This sample comes from side 2 of "Before and After Science" - or the side that I call "After Science." Those who were around when vinyl records and cassettes were the norm know that albums of the day had two distinct sides - and on "Before and After Science," they are truly distinct. Side one closes with "King's Lead Hat," about a band that Eno liked with a lead singer who (in those days) truly WAS a burning building. But when you flipped the record or the tape over, the next song brings the tempo down a bit. But "Here He Comes" is only transitional, since the following songs bring the tempo down even more.

Until you reach "By This River."

Unlike "King's Lead Hat," "By This River" begins with the sparsest instrumentation imaginable - a single piano. And while the instrumentation builds up toward the end of the song, it remains a very simple song.



Well, how do you rap over a sample based upon THAT?

Speed it up a bit and add a drum beat.



The song "Never Fallin'" appears on the Living Legends album Classic.

Monday, January 23, 2017

When music becomes controversial - the songs Clear Channel tried to ban after 9/11

Things that seem completely innocent one moment can become controversial in the next, due to a change in circumstances.

9/11 was one of those "changes in circumstances" that altered our reactions to particular songs.

As a contemporary article from the New York Times notes, Clear Channel (now iHeartMedia) sent a list of recommendations to its radio stations regarding music playlists.

Back on September 10, no one would have given a second thought to playing the Gap Band song "You Dropped A Bomb On Me." After 9/11, that wasn't such a good idea.

The Neil Diamond song "America" also made the list. Why? Perhaps because the words "They're coming to America" frightened people at the time.

So why was I reading an old New York Times article? Because on January 20, 2017, radio station KFI - an iHeartMedia station - aired a brief story about "El Chapo" being extradited from Mexico to the United States.

A brief snippet of the Neil Diamond song "America" introduced the story.